Freight Company DSV Launches Service to Help Customers Reduce Emissions from Transportation, Auto News, ET Auto


The global freight industry is currently on track to see its greenhouse gas emissions increase by about a fifth by 2050, with demand more than doubling over the next three decades, according to the International Forum. of the OECD Transport.

Danish freight forwarder DSV is launching services to enable customers to track emissions in their supply chain and identify reduction potential, the company said on Tuesday.

The global freight industry is currently on track to see its greenhouse gas emissions increase by about a fifth by 2050, with demand more than doubling over the next three decades, according to the International Forum. of the OECD Transport.

Large companies are increasingly asking for help to reduce their emissions when transporting goods globally, DSV said.

“We have always optimized our customers’ supply chain in terms of, for example, the number of stocks they hold,” chief executive Jens Bjorn Andersen told Reuters. “We can now design this with CO2 reduction as the goal. “

DSV’s new services include programs to monitor CO2 emissions and optimize supply chains to reduce them, as well as access to sustainable fuels and carbon offsets.

“There is a strong demand from our customers, so it is also a competitive parameter,” said Andersen, declining to specify the pricing of the new services.

With some 20,000 long-haul trucks on European roads every day and millions of square meters of warehouse space around the world, DSV handles everything from grass pallets to resurfacing football pitches and supply chains. comprehensive for multinational companies.

One of the main challenges will be to reduce emissions from roads, which account for around 65% of total freight emissions.

While electric trucks would run shorter distances, green hydrogen – a fuel obtained by passing renewable generated electricity through water to separate the element from oxygen – would be the solution to long journeys, Andersen said.

“Five years ago it was far-fetched, but now it’s available in a few years,” he said, adding that he expected the first truck tests to be hydrogen are made within two years.

Last year, truck makers including Daimler, Man, Volvo, Ford and Scania, a unit of Traton SE, the commercial vehicle arm of Volkswagen AG, pledged to stop sales of conventional diesel trucks from here. 2040.

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The Phoenix, Arizona-based company is testing electric and hydrogen trucks and studying alternative fuel sources for its coal-fired power plant in Indonesia, where it operates the world’s second-largest copper mine.

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